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A Reply to Jerome Lynes’ Critique May 16, 2017 — Dear Editor:In reference to a recent critique of the article “Special Operations Doctrine: Is It Needed,” by Jerome M. Lynes (12/21/16), we acknowledge the existence of Joint Special Operations doctrine. Upon reflection, we could title the article “Special Operations Doctrine: It Is Needed!” The intent of this article was to capture, share, and MORE

A Letters to the Editor A Critique of 'Special Operations Doctrine: is it Needed May 16, 2017 — Regarding the PRISM Vol 6. No.3 article “Special Operations Doctrine: Is it Needed?” by Charles T. Cleveland, James B. Linder, and Ronald Dempsey, I am struck by the curious absence of reference to the long established and mature body of Joint Special Operations doctrine. The authors write as if there was no special operations doctrine until Army Doctrine Publication (ADP) 3–05 came along in 2012. They opine as to the various reasons for this, including accusing “...the general military doctrine community (of holding) a myopic view of U.S. Special Operations Capabilities.” In truth, their contention is not factually correct. MORE

BR: The Great Surge: The Ascent of the Developing World May 16, 2017 — span.PRISM-end{ font-weight:bold; } span.superscript._idGenCharOverride-1, span.endnote-reference._idGenCharOverride-1, span.Endnote-superscript._idGenCharOverride-2{ vertical-align:super; font-size:smaller; } span.CharOverride-1, span.CharOverride-2{ font-style:italic; } p.Notes-heading{ font-size:16px; MORE

BR: Security in Africa: A Critical Approach to Western Indicators of Threat May 16, 2017 — span.PRISM-end{ font-weight:bold; } span.superscript._idGenCharOverride-1, span.endnote-reference._idGenCharOverride-1, span.Endnote-superscript._idGenCharOverride-2{ vertical-align:super; font-size:smaller; } span.CharOverride-1, span.CharOverride-2{ font-style:italic; } p.Notes-heading{ font-size:16px; MORE

BR: This Present Darkness: A History of Nigerian Organized Crime May 16, 2017 — span.PRISM-end{ font-weight:bold; } span.superscript._idGenCharOverride-1, span.endnote-reference._idGenCharOverride-1, span.Endnote-superscript._idGenCharOverride-2{ vertical-align:super; font-size:smaller; } span.CharOverride-1, span.CharOverride-2{ font-style:italic; } p.Notes-heading{ font-size:16px; MORE

Islam in from the Cold: A Muslim Brother’s Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future of the Islamic Movement in the Sudan May 16, 2017 — Ahmed found himself in Khartoum’s notorious Kober prison with Sheikh Hassan al-Turabi, éminence grise of political Islam, shortly after the 1989 coup d’état in the Republic of the Sudan.1 He and the coup leader al-Turabi, who infamously welcomed Osama bin Laden into the country in 1991, were close friends for years before he served as one of the leading members of the Sudanese Islamic Movement’s shura.2 Thus prison began the saga of the second Islamist rule in the Sudan with all of its twists and turns, and a watershed moment in Ahmed’s long journey as a Muslim Brother.3 MORE

The Armies of the Great Lakes Countries May 16, 2017 — Precolonial Africa was a rather special part of the world because durable state structures were extremely rare. Local chiefdoms or large (but transient) multi-ethnic empires—yes. Tight nation-states—hardly. Except in a rather limited geographical area to the east of the continent, a cluster of sacred monarchic states grew, expanded, and fought each other around the shores of the Great Lakes in Africa. There are no written records, so we can only fathom the historical depth of these monarch states through oral traditions, and these date to the 10th century. MORE

Brothers Came Back with Weapons: The Effects of Arms Proliferation from Libya May 16, 2017 — In November 2011, Mokhtar Belmokhtar of the North Africa-based al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) told the Mauritanian news agency ANI that “We have been one of the main beneficiaries of the revolutions in the Arab world…As for our acquisition of Libyan armaments that is an absolutely natural thing.”1 His statement summed up the fears expressed by many commentators—to include the author of this article—that large quantities of arms within Libya were left in unsecured stockpiles and would be proliferated to terrorists and insurgents around the world.2 Most vividly, in 2013 the UK’s Daily Mail newspaper, noted “spy chiefs” claim that Libya “has become the Tesco [supermarket] of the world’s illegal arms trade.”3 MORE

The Security Governance Initiative May 16, 2017 — It is estimated that from 2009–14, U.S. assistance to militaries and police in sub-Saharan African exceeded $3 billion.1 Of this, the United States spent approximately $900 million on peacekeeping efforts alone. The U.S. Government also provided an estimated $90 million in foreign military financing and sold more than $135 million worth of arms.2 Despite these substantial expenditures and investments, the ability of African states to address their security challenges remains insufficient. Some African peacekeepers are falling short in peacekeeping performance; terrorism and other transnational threats impede human development in several parts of the continent; and African citizens often mistrust their police and military forces. When the fundamental responsibility of the state for the security and justice needs of its citizens is inadequately executed, the result is often increased insecurity and de-legitimization of the government. MORE

Strategic Dilemmas: Rewiring Africa for a Teeming, Urban Future May 16, 2017 — Africa’s population is expanding at rates never seen before. Between now and 2050 it is predicted to double. Most of that growth—80 percent—will occur in urban areas. In the past decade alone, technology—especially mobile phones—has transformed the way Africans communicate and do business. Politics is also changing rapidly. Multiparty elections and popular support for democracy are the norm, even though the record across the continent is uneven and numerous countries have reversed course in recent years. MORE

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